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'Mad Men' Season 7 Episode 3 Recap: 'Field Trip' And Lunch With Rod Serling

Paul Levinson Paul Levinson
April 28th, 2014 11:05am EDT

Mad Men

"Lunch with Rod Serling" - that's what Megan's director was said to be having, when she interrupted him with a request to re-read a part, and the Rod Serling mention was very apt, since this episode of Mad Men - 7.3 - was even more like a Twilight Zone episode than most in this frequently surreal series.

Submitted for your approval... Don goes to Roger, who agrees to Don's request to get back to work in the firm, except Roger tells no one about this, and when Don shows up to work Monday morning, no one knows why he's on the premises.   Roger returns after a meeting with a client, another meeting ensues - of the partners - and Joan speaks out against Don's return.  But if I recall correctly from last year, wasn't Joan at least somewhat appreciative of Don as being the only one to stand up against literally prostituting herself to get a client that everyone else pushed her into?

But even more like The Twilight Zone was the denouement of this powerful thread: the partners allow Don to come back, but only if he agrees to eat a big plate of crow, including reporting to Lou!  I get that Don really wanted to come back to work - but I don't get why he didn't take the job that the other firm gave to him - and tell Jim and Bert et al to shove their offer.

And so concluded one of the most bizarre and edge-of-your-seat interludes in all of Mad Men. But Don's back where he presumably belongs.

Meanwhile, his marriage with Megan is further shaken, but she still apparently loves him, so likely their marriage will survive for now. Betty continues to show why she's one of the worst mothers in human history - maybe not quite as bad as Livia on The Sopranos - wondering all the while why her children don't love her.  And did I hear Roger blithely agree with Jim to get rid of Harry - i.e., fire him?

So went another hour in The Twilight Zone of this compelling drama of life in the ad racket now on the verge of the 1970s.

Photo Credits: Michael Yarish/AMC


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