Michael Phelps Pulled Over And Charged With Second DUI

Trailer Talk: 'Halloween II,' 'Taking Woodstock' & More

Evan Crean Evan Crean
August 24th, 2009 10:01am EDT
HALLOWEEN III have not had the chance to see "Inglourious Basterds" yet, but I'm hoping to catch it in the next couple of days. From the people I have spoken with that have seen it already, it's supposed to be really entertaining.

Other films in my current backlog include "District 9" which I've only heard positive feedback about, and the Paul Giamatti comedy "Cold Souls."

Two of the movies premiering this week are horror movies, and the other two are comedies. One of the films is another sequel annoyingly titled to resemble the first movie's title much like "Fast & Furious." Arriving at the box office are "Halloween II," "Taking Woodstock," "The Final Destination," and "Big Fan."



As Laurie Strode comes to grips with her brother Michael's deadly return to Haddonfield Illinois, Michael Myers prepares for a violent reunion with his sister.
Renegade horror filmmaker Rob Zombie directs and writes this follow up to his 2007 reboot of the "Halloween" franchise. Scout Taylor-Compton, Tyler Mane, and Malcolm McDowell reprise their roles as Laurie Strode, Michael Meyers, and Dr. Samuel Loomis respectively.

WHO SHOULD SEE IT: Horror-philes who appreciate Rob Zombie's unique vision and imagination when it comes to the genre will no doubt enjoy this sequel to "Halloween." Audiences looking to see quality horror movies that aren't the typical fodder should look no further than "Halloween II."





After Woodstock organizers lose the venue for their event, Elliot Tiber, a young man working on his parents' farm, helps them land a permit. He connects them with Max Yasgur, a dairy farmer whose land could be the perfect location for the festival of music and free love.

Ang Lee, the man behind 2005's "Brokeback Mountain" directs this film about the most famous music festival of all time. The screenplay for "Taking Woodstock," based on the book by Elliot Tiber and Tom Monte, is penned by frequent Ang Lee collaborator James Schamus.

WHO SHOULD SEE IT: Those who experienced Woodstock in all its glory and modern-day hippies born in the wrong era, will be clamoring to experience this magical time onscreen. Enthusiasts of the period piece genre should appreciate the movie's recreation of the 1960s in its clothes, its cars, its ideals, and most importantly its music.





Hunt Wynorski has a premonition that saves his life and the lives of his peers from a deadly racecar crash. Since Hunt and his friends have cheated fate by surviving, death sets out to claim them in other ways.

He passed on directing the third movie in this horror franchise, but David R. Ellis returns for its fourth. Based on characters developed by Jeffrey Reddick, Eric Bress who worked with Ellis on "Final Destination 2" pens this sequel.

WHO SHOULD SEE IT: Viewers who enjoy the cookie cutter style of the "Final Destination" horror/thriller movies should be inclined to check this out. The people that go to see this type of movie are mostly interested in a generic horror film that doesn't feature big name actors, so they aren't emotionally attached to the characters as they die off.

Watch "The Final Destination Trailer"






A hardcore New York Giants football fanatic, Paul Aufiero, grapples with the conflicted feelings he experiences about his team after he is beaten up by his favorite player.

The writer and director of "Big Fan" is Robert D. Siegel, who wrote last year's Darren Aronofsky hit "The Wrestler." Starring comedian Patton Oswalt as the main character Paul, "Big Fan" also features Kevin Corrigan and Michael Rapaport.

WHO SHOULD SEE IT: Audiences that love Patton Oswalt's sarcastic brand of humor should go to see this movie. Super fans out there will be able to identify with Paul Aufiero's plight, since most that are truly dedicated to following a certain team have had their devotion tested at one time or another.



Evan Crean
Story by Starpulse contributing writer Evan Crean, a movie trivia guru and trailer addict with a practically photographic memory of actors and directors. Get a first look at the movies premiering each week, which which ones will be worth your $10, which ones you should wait to rent and which ones aren't worth your time.