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'Grey's Anatomy': Sorry Seems To Be The Hardest Word (10x09)

Dani Langlie
November 16th, 2013 12:47pm EST

Grey's Anatomy

Sometimes these Grey's Anatomy posts really wear me out because there are so many plot lines to contend with, but this week was actually very different. The focus remained almost entirely on Callie Torres. I really, really liked this unusual format, because it gave a lot more time to focus on Callie and Arizona's characters, and the others were basically sidelined. I'd love to see some of the other characters given the same treatment in the future. But I'm getting ahead of myself. Let's take a look at this plot.

Callie is being sued for negligence in a case concerning a famous athlete. He came in for a hip replacement and ended up getting both legs amputated. We get a series of flashbacks that tell the story, including how Callie and Christina argued about his care, and how many risky calls Callie had to make. We also learn that Arizona and Callie were planning on having another child, but that Arizona miscarried, just adding to all of the problems in their relationship. As she goes to trial for this, at first it seems totally helpless. Callie's dad shows up, learning for the first time about Callie and Arizona's separation. Callie does end up winning the trial, but she finds a piece of information later that could have implicated her even further in the case. Callie chooses to conceal it. Following her dad's advice, Callie goes to Arizona and asks her if she wants to come back home. Arizona, in her hotel room, tells Leah that she should leave.

That's basically the whole plot, because as I said it focused very tightly on Callie and Arizona and it didn't go in to the other characters very much. I'm going to go over what I loved about this episode, but also what I didn't like as much.

The good stuff - focusing on Callie, as I've already said, is a good thing. Also, I enjoyed seeing Callie's dad again. I like how there's still lingering weirdness about the fact that his daughter is married to a woman, but that he still values traditional marriage and wants Callie to work it out. I liked the case. I think both the patient and Callie were very sympathetic in this episode. Of course I was rooting for Callie not to be guilty, but at the same time I felt enormously bad for the guy who had lost his legs. There were a lot of really morally grey moments in this episode, such as when Callie chose to willingly conceal evidence because it didn't really prove that it was her fault, but it could have skewed the jury against her. I also like that Callie asked Arizona to come home, but we know right away that it won't be easy for the two of them. There are still a lot of problems that they will have to face. Most of the other characters had a minor role here, but I loved how supportive everybody was of Callie, and how they all showed up to help her through the trial.

The not so good stuff - Honestly, I felt that the story line about the miscarriage was completely unnecessary. Callie and Arizona already went through enough in their last year of marriage, and I felt like the addition of this information didn't add anything to them as characters. It's really sad, don't get me wrong, but did we need anything more to make their lives really sad? Not so much! I also thought the persecuting attorney was laughably over the top. He was the only unambiguously "bad" character in the episode, as he didn't just do his job as a lawyer, he basically laughed in the face of Callie's distress and used a very smarmy friendly technique with the jurors in order to build a good relationship with them. While that's all fine and all very lawyer-like, I felt that it was overdone.

Wow, this has got to be by far the shortest Grey's Anatomy review I've ever done. But yeah, that's about all I can say. Overall, I did enjoy this episode for its tighter focus. However, the miscarriage plot took me out of the story a bit, which is why I can't give the episode extremely high marks.

7/10

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